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Championship Productions Featured Items!

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    RD-05319A:

    with Matt Clepper,
    Indy Warriors FC Head Coach;
    5x CICC Champions; 4x State Champions; WCSSF U19 League Champions

    The hardest thing to do in the game of soccer - and the most vital aspect that determines the success of your team - is finishing.

    In his five-year tenure with the Indy Warriors, Matt Clepper's teams average four goals or more per match - a total that is incredibly difficult to overcome and has powered the team to three IHSA State Championships in its brief history.

    Coach Clepper demonstrates how he teaches finishing at Indy Warriors FC and what has made his team an attacking threat at the high school level. He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different ideas on how to create an attack that will put fear in your opponents. You will learn the correct technique of finishing in terms of placement vs. power, proper runs that need to be made in the box when attacking the goal, how to incorporate the whole team and not just the forwards/strikers, and how the use of combination play and speed of play can help you gain an extra advantage when finishing.

    Create a Philosophy of Attack

    To help your team improve its attacking prowess, it is important to develop an attacking strategy that matches your team's individual strengths. Clepper starts in the classroom and maps out the key elements that make it difficult for your opponents to defend you while highlighting some useful and easy to remember principles of his attacking philosophy.ÿSome of the topics covered include:

    • Where forwards should position themselves to become incredibly hard for the opposition to defend.
    • How to take advantage of the other team's weaknesses.
    • How to create your best angles for attack.

    Once attacking strategies have been created and player positions are identified, Clepper demonstrates how to design movement strategies that enable players to make tactical runs on and off the ball that can unbalance defenses to score more goals.

    Wing Play

    Clepper teaches a few different attacking options from the wing position. The drills and games included in this video follow a progressive training sequence that will help you learn the secrets to building a dangerous attack from the wing.ÿ

    You'll see the 3v0 Wing drill, a crossing and finishing exercise that works on a wing player's angle of approach to the goal and getting to the touch line to create goal scoring opportunities. The emphasis in this drill is that the players develop a good sense of dribbling the ball with pace from wide areas. This includes cutting the ball back, early crosses, and the types of runs needed from your strikers. Once players start developing confidence, defenders are added for more game-like pressure. Clepper progresses the exercise in a more functional setting with passive pressure allowing the players lots of repetition.

    Still under the principle of wing play, Clepper introduces what is known as "probe dribbling." This is where the dribbler actively looks for gaps and spaces for a through ball. He starts this with a 4v4 game where the ball starts from the winger and dribbles around the top of the 18 yard box looking for runs from their supporting attackers to make in key areas. The exercise is progressed in a 6v4 game to add more supporting angles for the attacking team. Finally, Clepper moves to a 6v6 version of the game.

    Checking Forward

    In this segment, Coach Clepper shows the importance of the center forward with their movement and decision making on and off the ball. In a pattern play scenario, Clepper has his players in a 7v4 situation using half the field. During these patterns, players are given plenty of repetition at not only wing play, but also probe dribbling. Some key coaching points include:

    • The cues to look for to create a 1-2 or overlapping moment.
    • How the #10 can create space to get the ball.
    • Movement and decisions to make depending on pressure.

    Press and Switch

    Clepper sets up how to get your forwards to press to create more goal scoring opportunities. It's during this moment where players are taught to try and switch the point of attack to create a 1v1 on the opposite side to exploit the weak side. Players are placed in 5v6 situation, forcing athletes to not only get their head for the switch, but to maintain proper attacking shape and attack with pace once the ball is switched. To make this pressing situation work, Clepper breaks down three drills that isolate the center halfbacks.

    • Halfback Turn Drill - A simple passing drill that works on timing runs, receiving, and turning of the ball.
    • Halfback 2v1 - Works on movement of halfbacks in midfield to create space and then quickly and accurately send it to your wing player. The wing goes 1v1 and has to get a cross off to the other forwards.
    • Halfback Pattern - A pattern is set up so halfbacks can work on quickly and decisively connecting passes with dangerous wing players.

    Clepper finishes by showing how everything applies during a team scrimmage. He constantly emphasizes what his team's attacking identity is and uses a game situation to make sure the attackers are on the same page.

    Similar to his video on team defending, Clepper expertly details strategies to help teams at any level create a devastatingly effective attacking philosophy. This video is full of tactical discussions and on-field practice clips that will show you exactly how to bring these strategies to life on the field.

    75 minutes. 2018.



    RD-05319B:

    with Matt Clepper,
    Indy Warriors FC Head Coach;
    5x CICC Champions; 4x State Champions; WCSSF U19 League Champions

    The best teams in the world are well organized defensively and make it tough for other teams to play through. Top level teams like Atletico Madrid, the Italian National Team and Inter Milan (under Jose Mourinho) were known for their success because of the way they defended.

    In this video, Coach Clepper demonstrates how he teaches defending at Indy Warriors FC and what has made his team set records for goals against. Clepper teaches four different concepts that will help your team not only defend, but also transition quickly and get organized behind the ball. Clepper provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different ideas on how to transition quickly on both sides of the ball.

    Filling and Collapsing Space

    The easiest way to break down an opposing defense is to take advantages of gaps between the forwards, midfielders, and defenders. As these gaps are created, alignments must shift to stop the ball, leading to mismatches and goals. Clepper starts in the classroom and maps out the key elements that make it incredibly difficult for your opponents to score while highlighting some useful and easy to remember principles of his defensive philosophy. Some of the topics covered include:

    • Defensive cues to read the game to get a head start on your attacker.
    • The keys to not get beaten in transition.
    • How your defensive strategy should change as play gets closer to the goal your team is defending.
    • How to separate the attacker from the ball on the turn.
    • The proper shape, distances, and angles needed to defend in small groups.
    • How to defend properly to quickly start a counter attack.

    Defending Drills

    Coach Clepper teaches his philosophy about how to be a great individual and team defender. The drills and games included in this video follow a progressive training sequence that will help you learn the secrets to building a great defense.ÿDrills include:

    • 1v1 Facing an Attacker: Learn the three step process for shutting down attackers.
    • 1v1 Facing an Attacker's Back: Learn the key elements of how to quickly dispossess the ball from an attacker who receives it with their back to you.
    • 2v2: Learn the right spacing and movement so your players don't get split. ÿ
    • 4v4 Backline Walkthrough: Coach Clepper walks through the defensive responsibilities checklist.ÿThe series progresses into a live drill where the back four work together to stop the attack in various parts of the field. ÿ
    • 6v4: Learn how to defend and stifle the opponent's attack even when outnumbered. ÿ
    • 8v4: Learn how four defenders can keep eight players from scoring by being in the correct positions.ÿ

    The key coaching points in each drill include:

    • How to make adjustments as the ball moves across the field.
    • Keeping players organized and connected in order to stop through ball penetration.
    • How defensive spacing changes when you are defending a good dribbler.
    • The back four zonal shape and responsibilities when defending outside of the 18 yard box.
    • How to switch from zonal defending to man marking once the ball is inside the 18 yard box.

    Coach Clepper constantly emphasizes the principle of staying connected to eliminate through balls. ÿ

    On average, there are over 200 transitional moments during a game. It's important to master and take advantage of those moments to be successful, and this video will help you do just that!

    77 minutes. 2018.




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  • 08/23/18--22:00: Alan Yost 2-Pack
  • RD-05390A:

    with Alan Yost, Capital University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    coached Capital to their first NCAA Tournament victory in school history (2017);
    NSCAA Premier Diploma holder (highest diploma offered through the NSCAA); associate staff coach for the NSCAA;

    Alan Yost and his Capital men's soccer team qualified for the NCAA Tournament in 2017 and became the first team in program history to win a game in the tournament. Yost's 5-3-2 defensive formation contributed to his team's success thanks to its ability to quickly take advantage of the counterattack.

    This video from Coach Yost will help you teach your players to be successful in the 5-3-2 through a series of drills and games that focus on the technical and tactical buildup of the formation. Yost includes play diagramming and game highlights to help illustrate each teaching point he makes. The 5-3-2 is especially effective at keeping the opponent out of your critical scoring areas while enabling an effective counterattack through transition to finish.

    Building the Defense

    Reinforce fundamental individual defense and build to team defensive roles through a series of four drills and progressions. Coach Yost explains and demonstrates:

    • Front and back hand defending; as well as front and back foot defending.
    • Defensive roles in small-sided situations.
    • How to make offensive play predictable and how to recognize when to jump in during vulnerable situations to create a counterattack.

    Ball Movement Through the Midfield

    Through a series of two possession-focused drills and progressions, you'll learn to teach your midfielders to disguise their passes to facilitate ball movement. Yost shows how to work on ball movement in a small area and how to apply the same principles on a larger scale within the 5-3-2.

    Finish the Counterattack

    Coach Yost teaches a finishing drill that will train your players how to be successful when provided attack opportunities within the 5-3-2. He'll help you understand how to shift the formation to support the attack and what the roles and positioning requirements are to finish the ball consistently.

    The 5-3-2, when implemented as taught by Coach Yost, can tighten up your defense and be an effective counterattack formation. This session teaches and demonstrates the player/position roles and responsibilities that will help your 5-3-2 dominate the competition!

    118 minutes. 2018.



    RD-05390B:

    with Alan Yost, Capital University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    coached Capital to their first NCAA Tournament victory in school history (2017);
    NSCAA Premier Diploma holder (highest diploma offered through the NSCAA); associate staff coach for the NSCAA;

    In this video, Alan Yost works his team through a series of passing patterns, each of which incorporate a number of progressions. The session evolves into a number of small-sided games which add transitional play and build on the passing patterns that Coach Yost covers earlier in the video. Finally, Yost finishes by working on creating finishing opportunities through ball movement and transition play.

    Passing Patterns

    Through a series of three passing patterns, you will see how to maximize ball movement within your midfield shape. Yost runs his team through different options within each pattern while emphasizing the key points of:

    • Effective ball movement with the proper touch and pace on the ball.
    • Game-like verbal and visual communication.
    • Disguising passes with exaggerated feints and "selling the dummy."

    Small-Sided Games

    Yost gives you three small-sided games which build on the passing patterns and incorporate transition. You'll see how the elements of the passing patterns can help your team find success under pressure, as well as how changing game parameters can highlight specific coaching points.

    Finishing

    You'll see three finishing games which expand on the concepts taught within the passing patterns and small-sided games. Coach Yost emphasizes:

    • The creation of right and left options for the ball carrier.
    • Why attacking the defender's front foot will help athletes find success.
    • Being creative in the final third to create finishing opportunities.

    This video presents ideas that can help you design a complete practice. Every small-sided game incorporates transition play and continual play while providing plenty of touches for all players. Additionally, Coach Yost demonstrates three finishing drills (with several variations) to end the training session with fun, high-energy activities. This is a must-buy for any coach whose team could improve their ball movement and finishing skills!

    116 minutes. 2018.




    0 0

    RD-05383A:

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    In this video, Bobby Muuss demonstrates how he teaches his players to press and the art of counter pressing the "Wake Forest Way." He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players.

    You'll learn how to train your team to press and how to quickly counter press to win the ball back as fast as you can. Muuss explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • Reactions needed to win the ball back.
    • How to play proactive defense.
    • The importance of staying connected as a team to properly defend.

    Practice Segments

    Coach Muuss begins this session by having his players go through a warm-up. Within this warm-up, he addresses numerous aspects which include dynamic stretching, speed/agility/quickness, injury prevention, first touch technical work, and the foundation of individual defense with the use of mannequins.

    The second segment is "2v2v2+1." It's in this exercise that players must be aware of the defending team and how quick reactions are needed to make sure they're not on the wrong side of the ball when the game ends. This is where Muuss trains the habits needed to build his pressing game at Wake Forest. It also forces his players to play and make quick decisions in tight spaces.

    In the third activity, Coach Muuss shows a "7v3 Pressing Game." As with most of his games, players indirectly train multiple aspects of the game. Possession and pressing are key aspects that are covered in this game. Players are rewarded by not only keeping the ball, but counter pressing in small groups of three.

    The fourth game is a progression from the previous one, but Muuss adds additional numbers and larger goals to also work on finishing from close range. The teams are given specific roles to either keep possession or counter press and score within a given amount of time.

    The fifth and final game is 7v7+1. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session, but gives the teams additional points by winning the ball in the attacking half of the field to reinforce pressing and defending on the front foot.

    Coach Muuss shows you just how effective pressing can be and how Wake Forest has used it to their advantage, making them one of the best college teams in the nation.

    78 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.



    RD-05383B:

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    Bobby Muuss shows how he teaches his players the importance of playing off target players and the movement needed to attack quickly using the "Wake Forest Way." He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players.

    In this video, you'll learn how to train your team to play off target players. Coach Muuss explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • Movement and supporting angles going forward that create the most danger.
    • Good reactions in transitional moments.
    • Positioning of players in advanced areas and how to bring players into the match.
    • Importance of finding a rhythm in the opponent's half of the field to find central areas.

    Practice Segments

    Muuss includes six exercises that he uses at Wake Forest. He begins this session by putting his players through a warm-up. Here, he shows how to incorporate dynamic stretching, technical passing and first touch, speed and quickness, and injury prevention all within the warm up.

    The second exercise that Coach Muuss shows is what he calls "6v6+4 Transfer Box." This game addresses attacking, defending, and his transitional style of play. It's during this game that players are put in an environment where they have two target players to find; the central midfielder and center striker. The players also have to play using the correct shape while making the right decisions to be able to play through pressure and tight spaces.

    In the third activity, Muuss shows how he builds from an unopposed to opposed game with a 3v0 to 3v3 transition game. Throughout the session, he teaches his players the different types of runs they can make to not only create space for themselves, but also gain the ability to combine and find third man runners. As he adds three additional players, Muuss continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be to rip apart even the most compact defenses.

    Next, Coach Muuss increases the amount of players to make a 5v5 transition game. Once the ball enters the field of play, he forces two players to have to recover from transition, giving the attacking team a numbers-up situation going to goal.

    After the 5v5 game, Coach Muuss makes the situation more complex by making it 9v8. An element added is the use of "Area 14," which is a key area for successful attacking teams. Through the design of the session, players now have to recognize which area is best to attack based on the defending team and how they recover.

    The sixth and final game is a 7v7+1 game with touch restrictions. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session and adds the touch restriction to continue to force his players to play at a high tempo.

    No matter what system you play, you will need to learn how to play off certain key players to penetrate and go forward with pace. Coach Muuss does an excellent job of creating the right environment to teach his players, and this video allows you to take his techniques and implement them yourself!

    73 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.



    RD-05383C:

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    Wake Forest University is one of the top men's soccer programs in the country. In this video, head coach Bobby Muuss gives a rare behind the scenes look into what has helped the Wake Forest soccer program achieve tremendous success.

    Coach Muuss demonstrates how he teaches his players the importance of possession to penetrate and the art of counter pressing the "Wake Forest Way." You'll see numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous keeping the ball and allow them to quickly win it back. Muuss provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players, including:

    • The movement and supporting angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reactions needed to win the ball back.
    • How to read the play and make the right decisions based on positioning.
    • The small details needed to be a technical attacking team.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.

    Small Sided Games

    Coach Muuss begins by addressing the key technical elements needed for quick ball circulation, body position, and the ability to turn in a dynamic setting. You'll see three unopposed passing patterns that lay the foundation for his team's ability to play forward. The emphasis in these particular passing patterns is that the players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing while making sure the angles of support are correct. He progresses this by showing additional patterns to be able to attack and go forward.

    The second small sided game that Muuss shows is a 5v2 reaction game. It's here that he is able to cover the two main topics of the session, which are possession to penetrate using a third man and counter pressing. He trains his players to play using the correct shape and decision making to be able to play through pressure and tight spaces to find a central player. He also lays the foundation of getting into good habits of reaction when losing the ball.

    In the third game, which is 4v4+3, Muuss builds from his previous game into a more complex one with the same emphasis. He creates and shows a dynamic way of teaching the use of quick ball circulation and the ability to counter press when the right moment occurs. Throughout the small sided game, he continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be and how important it is to have good reactions in a competitive environment.

    The fourth small sided game is 7v0 to 7v5 Game. It's here that Coach Muuss builds his players in an unopposed environment while teaching them the playing style/philosophy he wants. These include three main objectives: ball circulation, wingers in, and positioning of the outside backs. Once the players are able to grasp the idea, he adds seven more players to the game.

    The fifth and final small sided game is a 7v7+1 game with touch restrictions. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session and adds the touch restriction to continue to force his players to play at a high tempo.

    Coach Muuss uses this video to show how he trains his teams to possess to penetrate and how to apply the counter press. Every coach must teach their team how to possess and play through the field, and this is one of the most in-depth resources to learn possession that you'll find!

    87 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.




    0 0

    with Alan Yost, Capital University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    coached Capital to their first NCAA Tournament victory in school history (2017);
    NSCAA Premier Diploma holder (highest diploma offered through the NSCAA); associate staff coach for the NSCAA;

    In this video, Alan Yost works his team through a series of passing patterns, each of which incorporate a number of progressions. The session evolves into a number of small-sided games which add transitional play and build on the passing patterns that Coach Yost covers earlier in the video. Finally, Yost finishes by working on creating finishing opportunities through ball movement and transition play.

    Passing Patterns

    Through a series of three passing patterns, you will see how to maximize ball movement within your midfield shape. Yost runs his team through different options within each pattern while emphasizing the key points of:

    • Effective ball movement with the proper touch and pace on the ball.
    • Game-like verbal and visual communication.
    • Disguising passes with exaggerated feints and "selling the dummy."

    Small-Sided Games

    Yost gives you three small-sided games which build on the passing patterns and incorporate transition. You'll see how the elements of the passing patterns can help your team find success under pressure, as well as how changing game parameters can highlight specific coaching points.

    Finishing

    You'll see three finishing games which expand on the concepts taught within the passing patterns and small-sided games. Coach Yost emphasizes:

    • The creation of right and left options for the ball carrier.
    • Why attacking the defender's front foot will help athletes find success.
    • Being creative in the final third to create finishing opportunities.

    This video presents ideas that can help you design a complete practice. Every small-sided game incorporates transition play and continual play while providing plenty of touches for all players. Additionally, Coach Yost demonstrates three finishing drills (with several variations) to end the training session with fun, high-energy activities. This is a must-buy for any coach whose team could improve their ball movement and finishing skills!

    116 minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    Bobby Muuss shows how he teaches his players the importance of playing off target players and the movement needed to attack quickly using the "Wake Forest Way." He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players.

    In this video, you'll learn how to train your team to play off target players. Coach Muuss explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • Movement and supporting angles going forward that create the most danger.
    • Good reactions in transitional moments.
    • Positioning of players in advanced areas and how to bring players into the match.
    • Importance of finding a rhythm in the opponent's half of the field to find central areas.

    Practice Segments

    Muuss includes six exercises that he uses at Wake Forest. He begins this session by putting his players through a warm-up. Here, he shows how to incorporate dynamic stretching, technical passing and first touch, speed and quickness, and injury prevention all within the warm up.

    The second exercise that Coach Muuss shows is what he calls "6v6+4 Transfer Box." This game addresses attacking, defending, and his transitional style of play. It's during this game that players are put in an environment where they have two target players to find; the central midfielder and center striker. The players also have to play using the correct shape while making the right decisions to be able to play through pressure and tight spaces.

    In the third activity, Muuss shows how he builds from an unopposed to opposed game with a 3v0 to 3v3 transition game. Throughout the session, he teaches his players the different types of runs they can make to not only create space for themselves, but also gain the ability to combine and find third man runners. As he adds three additional players, Muuss continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be to rip apart even the most compact defenses.

    Next, Coach Muuss increases the amount of players to make a 5v5 transition game. Once the ball enters the field of play, he forces two players to have to recover from transition, giving the attacking team a numbers-up situation going to goal.

    After the 5v5 game, Coach Muuss makes the situation more complex by making it 9v8. An element added is the use of "Area 14," which is a key area for successful attacking teams. Through the design of the session, players now have to recognize which area is best to attack based on the defending team and how they recover.

    The sixth and final game is a 7v7+1 game with touch restrictions. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session and adds the touch restriction to continue to force his players to play at a high tempo.

    No matter what system you play, you will need to learn how to play off certain key players to penetrate and go forward with pace. Coach Muuss does an excellent job of creating the right environment to teach his players, and this video allows you to take his techniques and implement them yourself!

    73 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    In this video, Bobby Muuss demonstrates how he teaches his players to press and the art of counter pressing the "Wake Forest Way." He provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players.

    You'll learn how to train your team to press and how to quickly counter press to win the ball back as fast as you can. Muuss explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the exercises:

    • Reactions needed to win the ball back.
    • How to play proactive defense.
    • The importance of staying connected as a team to properly defend.

    Practice Segments

    Coach Muuss begins this session by having his players go through a warm-up. Within this warm-up, he addresses numerous aspects which include dynamic stretching, speed/agility/quickness, injury prevention, first touch technical work, and the foundation of individual defense with the use of mannequins.

    The second segment is "2v2v2+1." It's in this exercise that players must be aware of the defending team and how quick reactions are needed to make sure they're not on the wrong side of the ball when the game ends. This is where Muuss trains the habits needed to build his pressing game at Wake Forest. It also forces his players to play and make quick decisions in tight spaces.

    In the third activity, Coach Muuss shows a "7v3 Pressing Game." As with most of his games, players indirectly train multiple aspects of the game. Possession and pressing are key aspects that are covered in this game. Players are rewarded by not only keeping the ball, but counter pressing in small groups of three.

    The fourth game is a progression from the previous one, but Muuss adds additional numbers and larger goals to also work on finishing from close range. The teams are given specific roles to either keep possession or counter press and score within a given amount of time.

    The fifth and final game is 7v7+1. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session, but gives the teams additional points by winning the ball in the attacking half of the field to reinforce pressing and defending on the front foot.

    Coach Muuss shows you just how effective pressing can be and how Wake Forest has used it to their advantage, making them one of the best college teams in the nation.

    78 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.


    0 0

    Bobby Muuss,
    Wake Forest University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    2016 NCAA College Cup Runner-up;
    3 straight appearances in the quarterfinals (2015-2017);
    Muuss' record in his first three years includes 55 wins - more than any other D I program in that same span.
    3x ACC Coach of the Year;
    former University of Denver Head Coach (2013 Summit League Coach of the Year);
    former Assistant Coach at UConn (2000 NCAA Champions, 3x Big East Champions)

    Wake Forest University is one of the top men's soccer programs in the country. In this video, head coach Bobby Muuss gives a rare behind the scenes look into what has helped the Wake Forest soccer program achieve tremendous success.

    Coach Muuss demonstrates how he teaches his players the importance of possession to penetrate and the art of counter pressing the "Wake Forest Way." You'll see numerous progressions that will help your team be dangerous keeping the ball and allow them to quickly win it back. Muuss provides in-depth illustrations both on a white board and on the field to show different key elements for your players, including:

    • The movement and supporting angles needed from supporting players.
    • Reactions needed to win the ball back.
    • How to read the play and make the right decisions based on positioning.
    • The small details needed to be a technical attacking team.
    • The importance of scanning and checking your shoulder for better vision.

    Small Sided Games

    Coach Muuss begins by addressing the key technical elements needed for quick ball circulation, body position, and the ability to turn in a dynamic setting. You'll see three unopposed passing patterns that lay the foundation for his team's ability to play forward. The emphasis in these particular passing patterns is that the players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing while making sure the angles of support are correct. He progresses this by showing additional patterns to be able to attack and go forward.

    The second small sided game that Muuss shows is a 5v2 reaction game. It's here that he is able to cover the two main topics of the session, which are possession to penetrate using a third man and counter pressing. He trains his players to play using the correct shape and decision making to be able to play through pressure and tight spaces to find a central player. He also lays the foundation of getting into good habits of reaction when losing the ball.

    In the third game, which is 4v4+3, Muuss builds from his previous game into a more complex one with the same emphasis. He creates and shows a dynamic way of teaching the use of quick ball circulation and the ability to counter press when the right moment occurs. Throughout the small sided game, he continues to stress how important off the ball movement can be and how important it is to have good reactions in a competitive environment.

    The fourth small sided game is 7v0 to 7v5 Game. It's here that Coach Muuss builds his players in an unopposed environment while teaching them the playing style/philosophy he wants. These include three main objectives: ball circulation, wingers in, and positioning of the outside backs. Once the players are able to grasp the idea, he adds seven more players to the game.

    The fifth and final small sided game is a 7v7+1 game with touch restrictions. Muuss uses this game to reinforce what was taught during the session and adds the touch restriction to continue to force his players to play at a high tempo.

    Coach Muuss uses this video to show how he trains his teams to possess to penetrate and how to apply the counter press. Every coach must teach their team how to possess and play through the field, and this is one of the most in-depth resources to learn possession that you'll find!

    87 minutes + 28 bonus minutes. 2018.


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    with Alan Yost, Capital University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    coached Capital to their first NCAA Tournament victory in school history (2017);
    NSCAA Premier Diploma holder (highest diploma offered through the NSCAA); associate staff coach for the NSCAA;

    Alan Yost and his Capital men's soccer team qualified for the NCAA Tournament in 2017 and became the first team in program history to win a game in the tournament. Yost's 5-3-2 defensive formation contributed to his team's success thanks to its ability to quickly take advantage of the counterattack.

    This video from Coach Yost will help you teach your players to be successful in the 5-3-2 through a series of drills and games that focus on the technical and tactical buildup of the formation. Yost includes play diagramming and game highlights to help illustrate each teaching point he makes. The 5-3-2 is especially effective at keeping the opponent out of your critical scoring areas while enabling an effective counterattack through transition to finish.

    Building the Defense

    Reinforce fundamental individual defense and build to team defensive roles through a series of four drills and progressions. Coach Yost explains and demonstrates:

    • Front and back hand defending; as well as front and back foot defending.
    • Defensive roles in small-sided situations.
    • How to make offensive play predictable and how to recognize when to jump in during vulnerable situations to create a counterattack.

    Ball Movement Through the Midfield

    Through a series of two possession-focused drills and progressions, you'll learn to teach your midfielders to disguise their passes to facilitate ball movement. Yost shows how to work on ball movement in a small area and how to apply the same principles on a larger scale within the 5-3-2.

    Finish the Counterattack

    Coach Yost teaches a finishing drill that will train your players how to be successful when provided attack opportunities within the 5-3-2. He'll help you understand how to shift the formation to support the attack and what the roles and positioning requirements are to finish the ball consistently.

    The 5-3-2, when implemented as taught by Coach Yost, can tighten up your defense and be an effective counterattack formation. This session teaches and demonstrates the player/position roles and responsibilities that will help your 5-3-2 dominate the competition!

    118 minutes. 2018.


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    with Jay Entlich,
    Columbus State University Women's Head Coach;
    2015 NCAA Division II National Runner-Up, 10 straight NCAA National Tournament Appearances (2006-15), 4x Peach Belt Conference Coach of the Year; 12x Conference Champs

    Jay Entlich shows you how to incorporate the 3-5-2 system of play into your program. He breaks the system down into three phases and explains each in detail before taking the field for a live practice.

    You'll learn how to position players based on defensive pressure on the ball. These tactics will give your team options no matter what situation or position they're in.

    Throughout Coach Entlich's 3-5-2 practice session, he keeps 22 players participating in the game for the entire practice. He uses "in-game" coaching points to teach individuals and also stops play occasionally to make team tactical points.

    Phase I - Getting used to the System of Play for a 3-5-2

    Phase I is an unopposed phase, which allows your players to get used to the nuances of positional reads as the game develops. Coach Entlich makes coaching points during play as well as stop action rehearsals as players get used to how they fit in the system.

    Phase II - Adds opposition and forces players to think and make decisions on the fly

    Phase II adds opposition playing in the same formation, but with an adjustment in the midfield that gives you two options on how to play the system.

      One style is more aggressive, using two attacking central midfielders.The other style is more defensive, using two defending central midfielders.

    Coach Entlich sets up an activity that helps bring out individual positional play and descriptions so all players can understand their roles and those of their teammates.

    Phase III - The real game!

    Phase III advances to two teams with goalkeepers in a real game, but with a modification to emphasize the key advantages to using the 3-5-2 system of play. Coach Entlich has players work on playing through the center of the field so when one team is in possession, the other team must have two of their center mids kneel down. This creates an advantage and promotes success in the attack. Your players will absorb and adapt to the formation while being totally engaged in playing the real game.

    This video is a complete dissection of the 3-5-2 style of play and a step-by-step method to incorporate it into your program. Your team will learn the expected runs of all supporting players, how to make decisions on the fly, combining to beat defenders and how to place the ball into dangerous areas.

    68 minutes. 2016.


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    with Jay Hoffman,
    Centre College Head Women's Coach; 2015 NCAA DIII Final Four;
    4x SAA Conference Champions (2012-15)

    To be successful in the attack, you need more than just your forwards making attacking runs. You also need your midfield players to expose the space from the opposition's back line as well.

    Ask Jay Hoffman for the key to his team's success and he will say the midfield. "If you win the midfield, you're going to win games," says Hoffman. This DVD will show you how Coach Hoffman trains his midfield - and how you can train yours - to break through an opponent's defense in this complete practice session.

    Five Instructions for Player Development

    Coach Hoffman preaches five principles to each player in his program to get them to play his desired style. Besides helping his players develop on the field, Coach Hoffman sees these instructions as vital to helping his midfield play more dangerously and be able to make passes behind the defense.

    Throughout the training session, Hoffman references moving after the pass and creating space for dangerous runs. He reminds his players to play quickly, but not at the expense of losing possession. He also encourages passing to the player that is making a run and to the foot of the player away from the defender. With these principles implemented, your midfield will be more dangerous when attacking.

    Teach Attacking Movements

    Coach Hoffman doesn't expect his players to move effectively on a full field without first teaching them to attack in numbers in small groups. The Centre College warm-up focuses on player movement while incorporating the five instructions: the players work on splitting defenders with the pass and making overlapping runs while passing to the correct foot and moving to create space for the runs. The warm-up transitions to a 4v2 possession game, where players must maintain possession while playing as quickly as possible.

    Attacking from the Midfield on the Full Field

    When play transitions to the full field, Coach Hoffman shows how his three-player midfield and two outside backs must combine and connect to his three forwards to attack successfully. With the field separated into zones, the drill starts off as 5v2 in the midfield zone and 3v1 in the attacking zone. Once his players start having success, he progresses this to 5v4, 3v2 with the same concepts.

    The final drill Coach Hoffman demonstrates is an 8v8 game using two-thirds of the field going to two big goals. It's here that he wants players to apply what has been taught from the small sided games into the match itself.

    Coach Hoffman pushes his players to attack the goal, and he finds perfect times to stop the games to coach his players. With such a numbers advantage, the attacking team is meant to experience success; Coach Hoffman adds defenders and encourages movements between zones to make drills more challenging for his players.

    Coach Hoffman is right when he says that the team that controls the midfield has the best chance of winning the game. If you want to help your midfield control the game, learn from a coach who has experienced success at the collegiate level doing just that. With this video, your midfield will soon be breaking down all opposing defenses.

    63 minutes. 2016


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    RD-05055A: with Jay Hoffman,
    Centre College Head Women's Coach; 2015 NCAA DIII Final Four;
    4x SAA Conference Champions (2012-15)

    No matter how good your team is at keeping possession and ball circulation through the thirds of the field, if you can't finish, your team will suffer. With teams becoming more solid defensively in front of the goal, it's important that you teach your team to play in wide areas and finish from these areas as well.

    Using in-depth illustrations - both on a white board and on the field - Jay Hoffman shows you several small-sided games to train your team to create and finish from both central and wide areas. This DVD explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • Placement vs. Power
    • Framing the goal from the supporting attacker and third man runners
    • The attitude needed to finish
    • Types of service from wide areas and the finishing needed for those balls

    Six Exercises for Crossing and Finishing

    Coach Hoffman provides a step-by-step guide to the main activities he uses at Centre College to improve the tactical and technical nuances of scoring.

    He begins with a two man unopposed finishing pattern that lays the foundation to his team's ability to finish and frame the goal - while incorporating conditioning as well. The emphasis is on players developing a quick combination before going to goal, and the importance of framing the goal from the supporting player. After the combination, it's important to make the proper decision based on the type of ball received and the angle of the goalkeeper.

    The second segment progresses to a two player horizontal finishing exercise with pressure. Here, Coach Hoffman puts his players in a more realistic game scenario, going to goal in a 1v1 with the goalkeeper. After the 1v1, he takes away the pressure and adds a supporting player, who must overlap and make it 2v0 going to goal with the goalkeeper. It's during this game that Coach Hoffman forces his players to have a shot or slot it across the goal for the supporting player, based on the quality of ball.

    Next comes four line shooting with a target player. This is an excellent unopposed technical game working on a player's first touch through various types of balls, finishing, through balls, and also forces players to frame the goal.

    The fourth exercise is the 4v4 Take Back Soccer drill. This 3v3 game in the middle forces teams to find their fourth player, who is a target player, and then quickly attack the goal with pace. This small sided game does a great job of incorporating attacking, defending, finishing, transition, possession with a purpose, and counter attacking all in one.

    The fifth small sided game shown is an 8 vs goalkeeper and defenders drill. Coach Hoffman puts an immediate restriction on how attacking players keep possession and finish against one defender and another goalkeeper acting as the second defender. Based on the restrictions given, this should create lots of interchanging, overlapping, and creative play from the 8 attacking players.

    The sixth and final segment of the training exercises is an unopposed passing finishing pattern. During this pattern, Coach Hoffman teaches the importance of framing the goal and the types of services needed to be effective in front of goal. He progresses the pattern by adding an overlap as the winger cuts in, giving the option of a third man run combination. The final progression adds an attacking midfield player, leading to 5 players crossing and finishing.

    This video from Coach Hoffman is sure to help your team improve their finishing and crossing!

    "I rank this video as a 5 or one of the best I have seen addressing this important topic.ÿ I took some of activities and used them with my High School team the night after I viewed the tape and found the players had a lot of fun (every player LOVES shooting exercises) and made improvement in their crossing and finishing. The activities are easy to set up, move fast and create many opportunities for the coach to address individual and team problems that can be fixed to improve the opportunities to score goals." - Customer Review

    57 minutes. 2016



    RD-05055B: with Jay Hoffman,
    Centre College Head Women's Coach; 2015 NCAA DIII Final Four;
    4x SAA Conference Champions (2012-15)

    One of the top tactical trends in Europe is breaking the last line of defense and the different ways a team can achieve this. In this video, Jay Hoffman demonstrates how he teaches his team to break the lines and the techniques that have made his team an attacking threat. These tactics have given his team back to back NCAA Final Four and Elite Eight appearances.

    Coach Hoffman shows you how important it is to have the correct team shape, timing of runs, proper decision-making and the right attitude toward breaking the lines. He provides in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, to show these different ideas on how to break the lines. He explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • Good communication before you pass the ball
    • Vertical, lateral & "C" cup runs by the high target player
    • Runs that trigger other runs going into the final third
    • Getting players to the correct foot, which will lay the foundation to break the lines

    Mastering the Tactic of Breaking Lines

    Hoffman has specific instructions to apply to your training sessions. All five of these training instructions can be applied in different aspects of the game.

    • Three Step Rule - This rule encourages getting away after making a pass to create space
    • Leave and Replace - Leave a space to create space
    • Play Faster but Keep Possession - One touch is the fastest way, but, it's not always the best way to play
    • Pass the Ball Where the Defender is Not - Look for the open foot or side away from the defender to help retain possession
    • Play the Player that is Moving - Don't go for the "home run" ball when it isn't on

    Practice Segments

    Hoffman develops a fluid session that encourages players to constantly think about how to get behind the line of defense. One of the things he does well is create exercises that reflect the true speed of the game. His progressions within each exercise are meaningful and his restrictions challenge players to try different ways to break in behind the last line of defense.

    He begins with a three-man unopposed passing pattern that lays the foundation to his team's ability to break the line. The emphasis in this drill is that the players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing, the decision-making based on which foot the player receives with, and how to play based on the type of pressure the player has on their back.

    The second progression is a 4v1 small sided game. This is where he trains his players to play using the correct shape, runs and decision-making to be able to break the line. Hoffman demonstrates two progressions within the 4v1 that help drive the point home with the type of runs needed to be dangerous. After the 4v1, he adds more pressure to make it 4v2, 4v3 and 4v4. During these games, the focus changes more to the decision-making based on the defender's positioning and implementing Hoffman's five training principles.

    The third segment features a 4v4 game using all three thirds of the field. It's here the players try and keep possession in the middle third to be able to find that entry ball in the opponent's final third. This small-sided game does a great job of getting your players to make the correct runs off the ball to be dangerous. After players grasp playing in the thirds, they play a normal game to find the solutions within the game.

    Every coach must teach their team how to break down opposition lines - Coach Hoffman does that, and more, in this innovative video!

    57 minutes. 2016



    RD-05055C: with Jay Hoffman,
    Centre College Head Women's Coach; 2015 NCAA DIII Final Four;
    4x SAA Conference Champions (2012-15)

    To be successful in the attack, you need more than just your forwards making attacking runs. You also need your midfield players to expose the space from the opposition's back line as well.

    Ask Jay Hoffman for the key to his team's success and he will say the midfield. "If you win the midfield, you're going to win games," says Hoffman. This DVD will show you how Coach Hoffman trains his midfield - and how you can train yours - to break through an opponent's defense in this complete practice session.

    Five Instructions for Player Development

    Coach Hoffman preaches five principles to each player in his program to get them to play his desired style. Besides helping his players develop on the field, Coach Hoffman sees these instructions as vital to helping his midfield play more dangerously and be able to make passes behind the defense.

    Throughout the training session, Hoffman references moving after the pass and creating space for dangerous runs. He reminds his players to play quickly, but not at the expense of losing possession. He also encourages passing to the player that is making a run and to the foot of the player away from the defender. With these principles implemented, your midfield will be more dangerous when attacking.

    Teach Attacking Movements

    Coach Hoffman doesn't expect his players to move effectively on a full field without first teaching them to attack in numbers in small groups. The Centre College warm-up focuses on player movement while incorporating the five instructions: the players work on splitting defenders with the pass and making overlapping runs while passing to the correct foot and moving to create space for the runs. The warm-up transitions to a 4v2 possession game, where players must maintain possession while playing as quickly as possible.

    Attacking from the Midfield on the Full Field

    When play transitions to the full field, Coach Hoffman shows how his three-player midfield and two outside backs must combine and connect to his three forwards to attack successfully. With the field separated into zones, the drill starts off as 5v2 in the midfield zone and 3v1 in the attacking zone. Once his players start having success, he progresses this to 5v4, 3v2 with the same concepts.

    The final drill Coach Hoffman demonstrates is an 8v8 game using two-thirds of the field going to two big goals. It's here that he wants players to apply what has been taught from the small sided games into the match itself.

    Coach Hoffman pushes his players to attack the goal, and he finds perfect times to stop the games to coach his players. With such a numbers advantage, the attacking team is meant to experience success; Coach Hoffman adds defenders and encourages movements between zones to make drills more challenging for his players.

    Coach Hoffman is right when he says that the team that controls the midfield has the best chance of winning the game. If you want to help your midfield control the game, learn from a coach who has experienced success at the collegiate level doing just that. With this video, your midfield will soon be breaking down all opposing defenses.

    63 minutes. 2016




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    with Jay Hoffman,
    Centre College Head Women's Coach; 2015 NCAA DIII Final Four;
    4x SAA Conference Champions (2012-15)

    No matter how good your team is at keeping possession and ball circulation through the thirds of the field, if you can't finish, your team will suffer. With teams becoming more solid defensively in front of the goal, it's important that you teach your team to play in wide areas and finish from these areas as well.

    Using in-depth illustrations - both on a white board and on the field - Jay Hoffman shows you several small-sided games to train your team to create and finish from both central and wide areas. This DVD explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • Placement vs. Power
    • Framing the goal from the supporting attacker and third man runners
    • The attitude needed to finish
    • Types of service from wide areas and the finishing needed for those balls

    Six Exercises for Crossing and Finishing

    Coach Hoffman provides a step-by-step guide to the main activities he uses at Centre College to improve the tactical and technical nuances of scoring.

    He begins with a two man unopposed finishing pattern that lays the foundation to his team's ability to finish and frame the goal - while incorporating conditioning as well. The emphasis is on players developing a quick combination before going to goal, and the importance of framing the goal from the supporting player. After the combination, it's important to make the proper decision based on the type of ball received and the angle of the goalkeeper.

    The second segment progresses to a two player horizontal finishing exercise with pressure. Here, Coach Hoffman puts his players in a more realistic game scenario, going to goal in a 1v1 with the goalkeeper. After the 1v1, he takes away the pressure and adds a supporting player, who must overlap and make it 2v0 going to goal with the goalkeeper. It's during this game that Coach Hoffman forces his players to have a shot or slot it across the goal for the supporting player, based on the quality of ball.

    Next comes four line shooting with a target player. This is an excellent unopposed technical game working on a player's first touch through various types of balls, finishing, through balls, and also forces players to frame the goal.

    The fourth exercise is the 4v4 Take Back Soccer drill. This 3v3 game in the middle forces teams to find their fourth player, who is a target player, and then quickly attack the goal with pace. This small sided game does a great job of incorporating attacking, defending, finishing, transition, possession with a purpose, and counter attacking all in one.

    The fifth small sided game shown is an 8 vs goalkeeper and defenders drill. Coach Hoffman puts an immediate restriction on how attacking players keep possession and finish against one defender and another goalkeeper acting as the second defender. Based on the restrictions given, this should create lots of interchanging, overlapping, and creative play from the 8 attacking players.

    The sixth and final segment of the training exercises is an unopposed passing finishing pattern. During this pattern, Coach Hoffman teaches the importance of framing the goal and the types of services needed to be effective in front of goal. He progresses the pattern by adding an overlap as the winger cuts in, giving the option of a third man run combination. The final progression adds an attacking midfield player, leading to 5 players crossing and finishing.

    This video from Coach Hoffman is sure to help your team improve their finishing and crossing!

    "I rank this video as a 5 or one of the best I have seen addressing this important topic.ÿ I took some of activities and used them with my High School team the night after I viewed the tape and found the players had a lot of fun (every player LOVES shooting exercises) and made improvement in their crossing and finishing. The activities are easy to set up, move fast and create many opportunities for the coach to address individual and team problems that can be fixed to improve the opportunities to score goals." - Customer Review

    57 minutes. 2016


    0 0

    with Jay Hoffman,
    Centre College Head Women's Coach; 2015 NCAA DIII Final Four;
    4x SAA Conference Champions (2012-15)

    One of the top tactical trends in Europe is breaking the last line of defense and the different ways a team can achieve this. In this video, Jay Hoffman demonstrates how he teaches his team to break the lines and the techniques that have made his team an attacking threat. These tactics have given his team back to back NCAA Final Four and Elite Eight appearances.

    Coach Hoffman shows you how important it is to have the correct team shape, timing of runs, proper decision-making and the right attitude toward breaking the lines. He provides in-depth illustrations, both on a white board and on the field, to show these different ideas on how to break the lines. He explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the games:

    • Good communication before you pass the ball
    • Vertical, lateral & "C" cup runs by the high target player
    • Runs that trigger other runs going into the final third
    • Getting players to the correct foot, which will lay the foundation to break the lines

    Mastering the Tactic of Breaking Lines

    Hoffman has specific instructions to apply to your training sessions. All five of these training instructions can be applied in different aspects of the game.

    • Three Step Rule - This rule encourages getting away after making a pass to create space
    • Leave and Replace - Leave a space to create space
    • Play Faster but Keep Possession - One touch is the fastest way, but, it's not always the best way to play
    • Pass the Ball Where the Defender is Not - Look for the open foot or side away from the defender to help retain possession
    • Play the Player that is Moving - Don't go for the "home run" ball when it isn't on

    Practice Segments

    Hoffman develops a fluid session that encourages players to constantly think about how to get behind the line of defense. One of the things he does well is create exercises that reflect the true speed of the game. His progressions within each exercise are meaningful and his restrictions challenge players to try different ways to break in behind the last line of defense.

    He begins with a three-man unopposed passing pattern that lays the foundation to his team's ability to break the line. The emphasis in this drill is that the players develop a good sense of rhythm when passing, the decision-making based on which foot the player receives with, and how to play based on the type of pressure the player has on their back.

    The second progression is a 4v1 small sided game. This is where he trains his players to play using the correct shape, runs and decision-making to be able to break the line. Hoffman demonstrates two progressions within the 4v1 that help drive the point home with the type of runs needed to be dangerous. After the 4v1, he adds more pressure to make it 4v2, 4v3 and 4v4. During these games, the focus changes more to the decision-making based on the defender's positioning and implementing Hoffman's five training principles.

    The third segment features a 4v4 game using all three thirds of the field. It's here the players try and keep possession in the middle third to be able to find that entry ball in the opponent's final third. This small-sided game does a great job of getting your players to make the correct runs off the ball to be dangerous. After players grasp playing in the thirds, they play a normal game to find the solutions within the game.

    Every coach must teach their team how to break down opposition lines - Coach Hoffman does that, and more, in this innovative video!

    57 minutes. 2016


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    with Brent Erwin,
    Grand Canyon University Assistant Coach;
    former, goalkeeper coach with FC Dallas of the MLS (Major League Soccer); former goalkeeper coach with the U17 Men's U.S. National Team; former SMU Head Coach

    If there was a video on the market that could drastically increase your team's scoring opportunities, would you buy it? Brent Erwin's leading edge drills continually place attackers in an endless array of scoring positions, unleashing their offensive prowess.

    Coach Erwin takes you through a series of fast-paced drills that teach players how to attack the back line. His innovative second ball drill simulates many of the second chance scoring opportunities that players often miss in games. He turns typical passing combination drills into short, action packed competitions, forcing players out of their comfort zone.

    Warm-up Series

    You can now skip slow, tedious warm-up drills and move straight into game actions that foster team chemistry while at the same time double as a dynamic warm-up. After a short white board session, Erwin walks players though the combinations used for future drills. The crawl, walk and run approach is used, giving you the flexibility to emphasize your own team needs. As the warm-up progresses, defensive players are added to create game-like conditions.

    One-Touch Opportunities

    Coach Erwin challenges old soccer training methodology with his use of "second ball" during game action. Players discover how to score more off of one-touch opportunities. His emphasis on scoring positions puts players in spots that the defense can't keep up with.

    He takes one of the hardest ideas for your young soccer players to master, identifying and attacking the defensive back line, and turns it into a strength. Coach Erwin's principles and progressions are intuitive, allowing coaches of all age groups to seamlessly apply them to practices. Your players will learn to:

    • Identify key scoring spots for more shots on goal
    • Transition from an attacking pattern into scoring spots to increase the number of second chance shots
    • Shoot off one touch, which improves scoring IQ
    • Learn how to break the back line with sophisticated angles and passes
    • Integrate passing patterns that confuse back line formations and leave them more susceptible to open shots

    7v7+1 Exercise

    Coach Erwin uses a free flow style of coaching and only stops play after several minutes to allow players to solve problems on their own. This style rapidly increases a team's IQ and chemistry while reducing the number of wasted possessions.

    Score more goals using Brent Erwin's innovative instruction on the best ways to break the opponent's defensive line!

    56 minutes. 2017.


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    with Schellas Hyndman,
    Grand Canyon University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    former FC Dallas (MLS) Head Coach; 2010 MLS Coach of the Year;
    former SMU Head Coach; guided SMU to 22 NCAA Tournaments in 24 years as Head Coach, won 15 conference titles and was named conference coach of the year eight times; NSCAA Director of Coaching Emeritus

    Many teams have taken to defensive tactics of compaction and organization in their half of the field, allowing superior teams to have the bulk of the ball and possession. An organized and compact press can allow less talented teams to break down superior opponents, or allow possession-oriented teams to quickly win the ball back in their opponent's half.

    Using a progression of team defense practice drills, Hyndman demonstrates four practice drills for pressing your opponent that build on top of each other. He concludes with a short video demonstration to reinforce the ideas taught.

    Pressing Drills

    Learn how to teach your players to have a two-way mentality and quickly go from offense to defense in order to win the ball back quickly. Coach Hyndman teaches the team philosophy of pressing quickly and with numbers in order to be effective. You'll see:

    • 6v3 - A passing exercise used to teach your team to trap effectively and to see the field
    • 6v6 Game-Like Pressing - Creates an environment where the defensive team can practice their pressing
    • 7v7 Game-Like Pressing - Improves individual defending
    • 11v11 Game-Like Pressing - Creates an opportunity to have a real life game situation with limitations on the offense
    • Game Film - Coach Hyndman brings you into the classroom and breaks down film on pressing

    Practice Segment

    With his 6v3 practice segment, Coach Hyndman begins to reinforce the mentality needed to be an effective high press team. He explains the importance of teaching your players to recognize when and how to press in order to be most effective at winning the ball back from your opponents.

    Coach Hyndman begins by using slides to give you visuals and then takes you to the field where you learn the importance of:

    • Having the mentality to attack with and without the ball
    • Physical conditioning to be equal to the demand of the press
    • Pressing using angles of pressure and positions of supporting players
    • Having key individuals to lead the press

    You then have the opportunity to see the drill live and hear comments from Coach Hyndman.

    Coach Hyndman gives you a lot of material to look over in this video. You'll be able to use the included content at practices as individual drills or as a progression for pressing.

    61 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Schellas Hyndman,
    Grand Canyon University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    former FC Dallas (MLS) Head Coach; 2010 MLS Coach of the Year;
    former SMU Head Coach; guided SMU to 22 NCAA Tournaments in 24 years as Head Coach, won 15 conference titles and was named conference coach of the year eight times; NSCAA Director of Coaching Emeritus

    Counter-attack soccer has evolved into more than just a moment in a game. This new style of soccer is becoming the fundamental attack for many teams in the world. In this DVD, Schellas Hyndman focuses on how you can incorporate counter-attack soccer into your style of play.

    Coach Hyndman thoroughly breaks down moments of transition in a game and how your players can recognize those moments. He does a great job teaching the key elements of counter-attack and then shows, through multiple exercises, how to apply those elements to a practice session. Players will learn the different types of counter-attacks and how each helps the team.

    3 Types of Counter-Attack

    Counter-attack can be defined in many ways. It's important for players to understand the different methods to counter-attack effectively. Coach Hyndman emphasizes three methods that teams use to generate a counter attack:

    • Running and dribbling with the ball into the opponent's area
    • Two to three quick passes forward
    • Long balls over the top

    His progressive training activity illustrates all three of these methods. A great measure of flexibility is afforded for you to pull out the segments that make the most sense in your own circumstance.

    Counter-Attack Practice Segments

    Coach Hyndman moves the session along from discussing angles and pockets of where players can receive the ball to begin the counter-attack, to playing against more defenders with a different array of numbers advantages.

    Practice builds up to players being put in different situations where they have to make decisions on how to counter-attack. Coach Hyndman stops play to describe how players can make a sound decision in these moments. He also discusses several key elements to counter-attack such as:

    • Immediate forward action
    • Teammates' willingness to support
    • Finding swift solutions to problems by looking for opportunities

    Coach Hyndman discusses the differences between a fast break and collective counter and between a solo counter and advanced counter.

    4v4+1 Exercise

    Most of the drills in this video start from a 4v4+1 set up. Coach Hyndman brilliantly incorporates quick ball speed, immediate forward action, a minimum number of passes and fast finishing into this activity. The activity can be expanded into numerous alternate iterations such as a 3v2, 5v1 or 5v2 counter. It's useful to be able to select the counter that best suits your own team.

    Relying on his professional experience as a player and coach, Schellas Hyndman outlines the basis of an effective counter-attack, then illustrates the development of a counter attacking mindset. Under the high pressure of these progressive activities, your players will learn to rapidly penetrate under the pressure of a recovering defensive unit.

    70 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Brent Erwin,
    Grand Canyon University Assistant Coach;
    former, goalkeeper coach with FC Dallas of the MLS (Major League Soccer); former goalkeeper coach with the U17 Men's U.S. National Team; former SMU Head Coach

    The modern goalkeeper must be able to play high enough up-field to act as a sweeping defender behind a back four, thus intercepting through balls and snuffing out attacks before they even begin. However, a poor decision by a sweeper keeper can quickly leave the goal undefended. Brent Erwin lays out a clear set of principles and match triggers to help goalkeepers be decisive and effective in this video; he shares how to teach a goalkeeper when to come for the ball, and, when to prioritize protecting the goal.

    Using a progression of individual goalkeeper and full team practice drills, Coach Erwin demonstrates drills for getting goalkeepers off their line and out of their comfort zones in order to be explosive in 1v1 situations and full field play. You'll be able to implement strategies to improve both technical aspects of goalkeeping (body positioning and hand foot placement) and tactical understanding of body position behind defenders and in line with the ball. Ultimately, goalkeepers will develop confidence in approaching the ball off the line in practice situations in order to perform confidently in high stakes game situations.

    Practice Segments

    Coach Erwin breaks down this video in three main segments. He first begins his session by using only his goalkeepers in a functional, unopposed situation dealing with the technical aspects of using your hands and feet. He also addresses how to effectively use the drop step for the goalkeeper to recover back on their line.

    The second segment adds pressure in a 1v1 game that forces the goalkeeper to play just outside the 18 yard box. An additional element added is how goalkeepers deal with the "chip" shot from the attacker. This puts the goalkeeper in a position to have to choose to set and confront the situation or drop and stay closer to their goal.

    Small Sided Game

    The last segment of the video is a small sided game that includes not only the goalkeepers, but how to add the entire team to address the needs of the goalkeeper in a 6v6+2 game with the field divided up in thirds. This game creates many opportunities for the goalkeeper to come out of their area to deal with different types of balls.

    Coach Erwin explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the game:

    • Best positioning to effectively sweep behind a back four
    • Clear triggers for when to sweep and when to recover
    • Proper technique for claiming through balls
    • Proper footwork for recovering to protect the goal
    • Recognizing situations where the keeper must anticipate and guard against being chipped
    • Clear communication and coordination with defenders
    • How the keeper should play based on the pressure on the ball
    • Which balls the keeper should come out to play vs. which balls the defenders should play
    • Encourage the player to take risks in practice so they know their range

    Coach Erwin gives you everything you need to coach the goalkeeper when it comes to playing off your line and being able to play with your feet and hands. You'll learn the technique, player mindset, body position and the proper positioning to best manage the space in front of the goalkeeper.

    56 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    with Ben Paneccasio,
    Men's and Women's Performance Specialist Coach at Grand Canyon University

    Soccer is a sport that demands long periods of running and long bouts of concentration on the ball no matter what age. Physically, players need speed, power, agility and quickness to be successful with the ball against an opponent.

    Ben Paneccasio gives you everything you need to know to set up your own conditioning program to help get your team in shape, along with touches necessary to win. In this video, he demonstrates how to utilize the four energy zone progressions needed for players to be physically ready to play soccer at a high level.

    You'll see how to combine training zones with playing zones. Each zone has different levels of fitness goals to achieve along with drills to use for the zone. This incorporates technical work with conditioning rates and gets your players to focus on technique:

    • Zone 1 - longer duration; lower pace
    • Zone 2 - medium duration; moderate intensity (aerobic power)
    • Zone 3 - shorter duration; high intensity (anaerobic power)
    • Zone 4 - short duration; maximum intensity (anaerobic endurance)

    He walks you through the four energy zones step-by-step with diagrams, PowerPoints, and on-field exercises. You'll see how to go from light to maximum effort with easy to follow guidelines. Games can also be used in the progressions. You can copy Coach Paneccasio's drills or create your own using the energy zone progressions.

    Coach Paneccasio gives you the ability to mix fitness and soccer without losing time just sprinting up and back on the field. The activities in this video are mentally engaging, challenging and fun. Your players won't even realize they're doing the conditioning part of practice!

    55 minutes. 2017.


    0 0

    RD-05110A:

    with Schellas Hyndman,
    Grand Canyon University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    former FC Dallas (MLS) Head Coach; 2010 MLS Coach of the Year;
    former SMU Head Coach; guided SMU to 22 NCAA Tournaments in 24 years as Head Coach, won 15 conference titles and was named conference coach of the year eight times; NSCAA Director of Coaching Emeritus

    Counter-attack soccer has evolved into more than just a moment in a game. This new style of soccer is becoming the fundamental attack for many teams in the world. In this DVD, Schellas Hyndman focuses on how you can incorporate counter-attack soccer into your style of play.

    Coach Hyndman thoroughly breaks down moments of transition in a game and how your players can recognize those moments. He does a great job teaching the key elements of counter-attack and then shows, through multiple exercises, how to apply those elements to a practice session. Players will learn the different types of counter-attacks and how each helps the team.

    3 Types of Counter-Attack

    Counter-attack can be defined in many ways. It's important for players to understand the different methods to counter-attack effectively. Coach Hyndman emphasizes three methods that teams use to generate a counter attack:

    • Running and dribbling with the ball into the opponent's area
    • Two to three quick passes forward
    • Long balls over the top

    His progressive training activity illustrates all three of these methods. A great measure of flexibility is afforded for you to pull out the segments that make the most sense in your own circumstance.

    Counter-Attack Practice Segments

    Coach Hyndman moves the session along from discussing angles and pockets of where players can receive the ball to begin the counter-attack, to playing against more defenders with a different array of numbers advantages.

    Practice builds up to players being put in different situations where they have to make decisions on how to counter-attack. Coach Hyndman stops play to describe how players can make a sound decision in these moments. He also discusses several key elements to counter-attack such as:

    • Immediate forward action
    • Teammates' willingness to support
    • Finding swift solutions to problems by looking for opportunities

    Coach Hyndman discusses the differences between a fast break and collective counter and between a solo counter and advanced counter.

    4v4+1 Exercise

    Most of the drills in this video start from a 4v4+1 set up. Coach Hyndman brilliantly incorporates quick ball speed, immediate forward action, a minimum number of passes and fast finishing into this activity. The activity can be expanded into numerous alternate iterations such as a 3v2, 5v1 or 5v2 counter. It's useful to be able to select the counter that best suits your own team.

    Relying on his professional experience as a player and coach, Schellas Hyndman outlines the basis of an effective counter-attack, then illustrates the development of a counter attacking mindset. Under the high pressure of these progressive activities, your players will learn to rapidly penetrate under the pressure of a recovering defensive unit.

    70 minutes. 2017.



    RD-05110B:

    with Schellas Hyndman,
    Grand Canyon University Head Men's Soccer Coach;
    former FC Dallas (MLS) Head Coach; 2010 MLS Coach of the Year;
    former SMU Head Coach; guided SMU to 22 NCAA Tournaments in 24 years as Head Coach, won 15 conference titles and was named conference coach of the year eight times; NSCAA Director of Coaching Emeritus

    Many teams have taken to defensive tactics of compaction and organization in their half of the field, allowing superior teams to have the bulk of the ball and possession. An organized and compact press can allow less talented teams to break down superior opponents, or allow possession-oriented teams to quickly win the ball back in their opponent's half.

    Using a progression of team defense practice drills, Hyndman demonstrates four practice drills for pressing your opponent that build on top of each other. He concludes with a short video demonstration to reinforce the ideas taught.

    Pressing Drills

    Learn how to teach your players to have a two-way mentality and quickly go from offense to defense in order to win the ball back quickly. Coach Hyndman teaches the team philosophy of pressing quickly and with numbers in order to be effective. You'll see:

    • 6v3 - A passing exercise used to teach your team to trap effectively and to see the field
    • 6v6 Game-Like Pressing - Creates an environment where the defensive team can practice their pressing
    • 7v7 Game-Like Pressing - Improves individual defending
    • 11v11 Game-Like Pressing - Creates an opportunity to have a real life game situation with limitations on the offense
    • Game Film - Coach Hyndman brings you into the classroom and breaks down film on pressing

    Practice Segment

    With his 6v3 practice segment, Coach Hyndman begins to reinforce the mentality needed to be an effective high press team. He explains the importance of teaching your players to recognize when and how to press in order to be most effective at winning the ball back from your opponents.

    Coach Hyndman begins by using slides to give you visuals and then takes you to the field where you learn the importance of:

    • Having the mentality to attack with and without the ball
    • Physical conditioning to be equal to the demand of the press
    • Pressing using angles of pressure and positions of supporting players
    • Having key individuals to lead the press

    You then have the opportunity to see the drill live and hear comments from Coach Hyndman.

    Coach Hyndman gives you a lot of material to look over in this video. You'll be able to use the included content at practices as individual drills or as a progression for pressing.

    61 minutes. 2017.



    RD-05110C:

    with Brent Erwin,
    Grand Canyon University Assistant Coach;
    former, goalkeeper coach with FC Dallas of the MLS (Major League Soccer); former goalkeeper coach with the U17 Men's U.S. National Team; former SMU Head Coach

    If there was a video on the market that could drastically increase your team's scoring opportunities, would you buy it? Brent Erwin's leading edge drills continually place attackers in an endless array of scoring positions, unleashing their offensive prowess.

    Coach Erwin takes you through a series of fast-paced drills that teach players how to attack the back line. His innovative second ball drill simulates many of the second chance scoring opportunities that players often miss in games. He turns typical passing combination drills into short, action packed competitions, forcing players out of their comfort zone.

    Warm-up Series

    You can now skip slow, tedious warm-up drills and move straight into game actions that foster team chemistry while at the same time double as a dynamic warm-up. After a short white board session, Erwin walks players though the combinations used for future drills. The crawl, walk and run approach is used, giving you the flexibility to emphasize your own team needs. As the warm-up progresses, defensive players are added to create game-like conditions.

    One-Touch Opportunities

    Coach Erwin challenges old soccer training methodology with his use of "second ball" during game action. Players discover how to score more off of one-touch opportunities. His emphasis on scoring positions puts players in spots that the defense can't keep up with.

    He takes one of the hardest ideas for your young soccer players to master, identifying and attacking the defensive back line, and turns it into a strength. Coach Erwin's principles and progressions are intuitive, allowing coaches of all age groups to seamlessly apply them to practices. Your players will learn to:

    • Identify key scoring spots for more shots on goal
    • Transition from an attacking pattern into scoring spots to increase the number of second chance shots
    • Shoot off one touch, which improves scoring IQ
    • Learn how to break the back line with sophisticated angles and passes
    • Integrate passing patterns that confuse back line formations and leave them more susceptible to open shots

    7v7+1 Exercise

    Coach Erwin uses a free flow style of coaching and only stops play after several minutes to allow players to solve problems on their own. This style rapidly increases a team's IQ and chemistry while reducing the number of wasted possessions.

    Score more goals using Brent Erwin's innovative instruction on the best ways to break the opponent's defensive line!

    56 minutes. 2017.



    RD-05110D:

    with Brent Erwin,
    Grand Canyon University Assistant Coach;
    former, goalkeeper coach with FC Dallas of the MLS (Major League Soccer); former goalkeeper coach with the U17 Men's U.S. National Team; former SMU Head Coach

    The modern goalkeeper must be able to play high enough up-field to act as a sweeping defender behind a back four, thus intercepting through balls and snuffing out attacks before they even begin. However, a poor decision by a sweeper keeper can quickly leave the goal undefended. Brent Erwin lays out a clear set of principles and match triggers to help goalkeepers be decisive and effective in this video; he shares how to teach a goalkeeper when to come for the ball, and, when to prioritize protecting the goal.

    Using a progression of individual goalkeeper and full team practice drills, Coach Erwin demonstrates drills for getting goalkeepers off their line and out of their comfort zones in order to be explosive in 1v1 situations and full field play. You'll be able to implement strategies to improve both technical aspects of goalkeeping (body positioning and hand foot placement) and tactical understanding of body position behind defenders and in line with the ball. Ultimately, goalkeepers will develop confidence in approaching the ball off the line in practice situations in order to perform confidently in high stakes game situations.

    Practice Segments

    Coach Erwin breaks down this video in three main segments. He first begins his session by using only his goalkeepers in a functional, unopposed situation dealing with the technical aspects of using your hands and feet. He also addresses how to effectively use the drop step for the goalkeeper to recover back on their line.

    The second segment adds pressure in a 1v1 game that forces the goalkeeper to play just outside the 18 yard box. An additional element added is how goalkeepers deal with the "chip" shot from the attacker. This puts the goalkeeper in a position to have to choose to set and confront the situation or drop and stay closer to their goal.

    Small Sided Game

    The last segment of the video is a small sided game that includes not only the goalkeepers, but how to add the entire team to address the needs of the goalkeeper in a 6v6+2 game with the field divided up in thirds. This game creates many opportunities for the goalkeeper to come out of their area to deal with different types of balls.

    Coach Erwin explains the teaching points he emphasizes during the game:

    • Best positioning to effectively sweep behind a back four
    • Clear triggers for when to sweep and when to recover
    • Proper technique for claiming through balls
    • Proper footwork for recovering to protect the goal
    • Recognizing situations where the keeper must anticipate and guard against being chipped
    • Clear communication and coordination with defenders
    • How the keeper should play based on the pressure on the ball
    • Which balls the keeper should come out to play vs. which balls the defenders should play
    • Encourage the player to take risks in practice so they know their range

    Coach Erwin gives you everything you need to coach the goalkeeper when it comes to playing off your line and being able to play with your feet and hands. You'll learn the technique, player mindset, body position and the proper positioning to best manage the space in front of the goalkeeper.

    56 minutes. 2017.



    RD-05110E:

    with Ben Paneccasio,
    Men's and Women's Performance Specialist Coach at Grand Canyon University

    Soccer is a sport that demands long periods of running and long bouts of concentration on the ball no matter what age. Physically, players need speed, power, agility and quickness to be successful with the ball against an opponent.

    Ben Paneccasio gives you everything you need to know to set up your own conditioning program to help get your team in shape, along with touches necessary to win. In this video, he demonstrates how to utilize the four energy zone progressions needed for players to be physically ready to play soccer at a high level.

    You'll see how to combine training zones with playing zones. Each zone has different levels of fitness goals to achieve along with drills to use for the zone. This incorporates technical work with conditioning rates and gets your players to focus on technique:

    • Zone 1 - longer duration; lower pace
    • Zone 2 - medium duration; moderate intensity (aerobic power)
    • Zone 3 - shorter duration; high intensity (anaerobic power)
    • Zone 4 - short duration; maximum intensity (anaerobic endurance)

    He walks you through the four energy zones step-by-step with diagrams, PowerPoints, and on-field exercises. You'll see how to go from light to maximum effort with easy to follow guidelines. Games can also be used in the progressions. You can copy Coach Paneccasio's drills or create your own using the energy zone progressions.

    Coach Paneccasio gives you the ability to mix fitness and soccer without losing time just sprinting up and back on the field. The activities in this video are mentally engaging, challenging and fun. Your players won't even realize they're doing the conditioning part of practice!

    55 minutes. 2017.




    0 0
  • 09/24/18--22:00: Soccer Science
  • edited by Tony Strudwick, head of performance at Manchester United Football Club

    Through the years a wealth of information has been accumulated in soccer. Experiential and science-based knowledge abounds in the sport. Yet the scientific information has not been sufficiently disseminated to those who would benefit most from it.

    Soccer Science fills the void with the best and most up-to-date research in the sport.

    With editor Tony Strudwick and a who's-who list of international experts on the sport, Soccer Science offers you an unprecedented wealth of advanced yet accessible information on biomechanics, physiology, psychology, skill acquisition and coaching, tactical approaches and performance and match analysis. It is simply the most significant and comprehensive published work on the sport.

    664. 2016.


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